EXCLUSIVE: Bill Clinton turned to Monica Lewinsky because he could ‘no longer trust’ depressed Hillary

New book reveals: After her humiliating healthcare reform failure Bill Clinton sought 'solace' in Monica Lewinsky because he could 'no longer trust' depressed Hillary

Widget not in any sidebars

New book reveals: After her humiliating healthcare reform failure Bill Clinton sought ‘solace’ in Monica Lewinsky because he could ‘no longer trust’ depressed Hillary

Bill Clinton may have cheated on his wife with Monica Lewinsky because he had lost confidence in her when she failed to pass healthcare reform, a new book suggests. According to this:

The former president may have sought ‘solace’ in the White House intern after Hillary bungled what should have been the biggest achievement of his first term in office.

Bill ‘no longer trusted’ Hillary, who he entrusted with the policy, while she withdrew into a prolonged depression, Partner to Power: The Secret World of Presidents and Their Most Trusted Advisers – suggests.

Author and former senior adviser to Congress K. Ward Cummings paints a scathing portrait of a president and a first lady who failed because ‘compromise was not part of their vocabulary.’

foe.’In fact, guilt was the ‘driving psychological influence’ in their marriage; Bill felt it for his philandering and Hillary used it to get what she wanted.




47B3648E00000578-0-image-a-20_1514910505440
47B3649600000578-0-image-m-18_1514910452192
47B3649A00000578-0-image-a-48_1514912773968
47B3ADBF00000578-0-image-m-30_1514910649955
Bill and Hillary Marriage New Book Details
**THIS IMAGE HAS NOT YET BEEN INDEXED BY THE LIBRARY.  IF IN ANY
38D4823D00000578-5229369-Bill_and_Monica_in_1998-a-1_1514924408799

Within this unhealthy dynamic, Hillary was ‘addicted’ to her husband who rebuffed her and then came to her to be rescued, giving her the love that she craved.

Hillary’s role as her husband’s close adviser is among those recounted in Cummings’s book, which covers advisers from the presidency of Washington to the modern day.

She was one of the most striking because she ‘stretched the boundaries of the Office of the First Lady more than anyone in history,’ he writes. 

But since the time of George Washington, presidents have needed a righthand man – in his case Alexander Hamilton – as their personal counsel. 

Most presidents choose one individual or a small group to serve as their confidantes who often work behind the scenes, but at times, such as those during the Bill-Hillary era, they are very public. 

When the Clintons arrived in the White House in 1993 there were Democratic majorities in the Senate and the House and it looked as though they would achieve something which had eluded Congress for decades; comprehensive healthcare reform.

Bill thought that Hillary was ‘essential to his success’ after she helped him win a second term as Arkansas governor.

‘Bill had become deeply and unhealthily dependent on Hillary and she developed a similarly profound sense of entitlement for helping to turn his career around,’ Cummings writes.

‘She felt she had earned the right to be regarded as a partner to his power.

‘Placing her at the helm of his signature program was an expression of their new power-sharing arrangement,’ which, Cummings writes, turned out to be a ‘gross miscalculation that he would deeply regret.’ 

‘As the saying goes, a team, like a chain, is only as strong as its weakest link.

‘The Clinton partnership in the White House would prove this as the flaws of their dysfunctional marriage.’ 

Hillary’s National Taskforce on Health Reform was announced on January 25, 1993 and it quickly ballooned from 12 to 500 people split into 12 ‘cluster teams’ and 38 ‘sub groups.’ 

She immediately sparked a row when she insisted that all meetings take place behind closed doors to prevent leaks.

The Association of American Physicians and Surgeons responded with a lawsuit, demanding she keep them public. The organization won and the health insurance industry began a PR campaign which turned America against her.

Hillary’s next error would be when she shunned offers from a bipartisan group of senators to create a scaled down program.

She vilified those who told her she would fail and would not even meet with senators offering a compromise.

Cummings writes: ‘Hillary would not alter her strategy because she believed herself to be totally in the right.

Continue Reading



Widget not in any sidebars

Advertisements

Comment:

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.